Great Summer Reading Choices

It turns out, I’ve made some great choices for my summer reading this year. I’ve finished three of the dozen books on my list, and I’m well into two others. There’s not been a clunker in the bunch! (All book links below are Amazon affiliate links.)

 

What Alice Forgot, by Liane Moriarty was a fabulously fun read. The only thing that would have made it better would have been if I could have read it on the beach! Set in Australia, the book begins with a rather foggy dream just before Alice wakes up on the floor of the gym with a tremendous headache. The funny thing is, Alice hates the gym, so why was she even there? A tumble during a spinning class, resulting in a good blow to the head, results in Alice’s forgetting the last ten years of her life. Her confusion over the mess her marriage is in, the distant relationship that’s developed with her sister, and the changes that she’s made personally in the last ten years, give her plenty of opportunity to reflect on what is really important to her and what is not. There are plenty of twists and turns and the book had me guessing about how things would turn out until the very end.  I loved this book!! It was funny and smart and brings home the importance of family relationships. Read it before Hollywood picks it up and makes a movie, because you know the movie is never as good as the book!  (The book is written for adults and contains mature subject matter, though there is nothing graphic.)

If your only exposure to Charles Portis’s True Grit comes chiefly from the old John Wayne movie by the same title, you are in for a wonderful surprise. The book is a gritty western (lots of violence, no sex), that tells the story of a plucky young girl who sets out to see justice done in the matter of the murder of her beloved father. She hires the only man that she thinks will get the job done, the man whom they all say has true grit. It’s a love story, really, though not of the romantic sort. Mattie Ross is a confident, capable young girl. Rooster Cogburn, a crusty individual of questionable character, is the Texas Ranger Mattie hires to track down and bring her father’s killer to justice. The cadence of the dialogue is catchy, and it’s interspersed with edgy bits of humor. The bad guys are bad, but the good guys have their flaws, too. This was a great read!

I’m sure that I read this book in high school, but it must have been lost on me at the time. I didn’t remember a thing about it. When I was pulling together my summer reading list, I wanted to include at least one proven classic, and somehow To Kill a Mockingbird was the book I chose. I’m so glad that I did! Set in the deep south of several decades ago, the tale is told through the eyes of a young girl. Her elementary school years are difficult as her teacher’s struggle to teach a classroom full of children from very, very diverse backgrounds. The carefree summers of her childhood, spent in the company of her older brother and the neighbor’s visiting nephew are beautiful and adventure filled. The children’s games are not without consequences, though, especially when they might cause other folks emotional harm. The real story, though, involves the hard life lessons that are learned about loyalty, bigotry and injustice. It’s a beautiful story!

You know that I think that it’s important that you make the time to read.  If you’re not sure where to start, I heartily recommend all three of the books mentioned above.

What’s on your summer reading list?

My summer reading list
The books I’ve read so far this year can be found in the right hand side bar.

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2 comments to Great Summer Reading Choices

  • I LOVE To Kill A Mockingbird! One of my all time favorite books! I am working my way through God’s Smuggler right now before I move onto others in my pile. I might have to consider What Alice Forgot. Sometimes I get too caught up in too many non-fiction books and need something a little less ‘heavy’ 🙂

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